An Innovative Neglected Invisible Hazard Identification (NIHI) at Workplaces; the Case of Athletics Hall Boroujen-Iran

  • HAMID SARKHEIL College of Environment, Karaj
  • JAVAD TAVAKOLI College of Environment, Karaj
  • SOROUSH REZVANI College of Environment, Karaj

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

 

In order to achieve safe conditions at workplace should correctly understand the concept of Hazard. In the hazard conceptual and common definition this means that dangerous event or situation that may lead to an emergency or disaster. It could also be a biological, chemical, or physical agent in (or a property of) an environment that may have an adverse health effect, or may cause injury or loss. As such, a hazard is a potential and not an actual possibility. Nowadays all industrial managers try to achieve higher levels of safety knowledge and move to have a safer workplace (so most of the industrials and engineers are familiar with the concept of hazard even though this knowledge is not quite perfect). But the volume of definitions and guidelines make this motion be stopped and caused confusion the management. Moreover in order to achieve a safer industry it is needed to know hazard better and use of more suitable methods to evaluate hazard and risk assessment in order to cover all bad condition in work place, activity and so on, and finally eliminate them to have safer industry. Then we need a more comprehensive look to define these concepts. In this study, we define new concept of hazard as visible and invisible hazard with more comprehensive look on-site Athletics Hall Boroujen in west Iran. We could innovatively, identify this group of hazard that means Neglected-Invisible Hazard (NIH) due to more focus on visible hazard.

Author Biographies

HAMID SARKHEIL, College of Environment, Karaj
Environmental Enginerring Department-HSE
JAVAD TAVAKOLI, College of Environment, Karaj
Environmental Enginerring Department-HSE
SOROUSH REZVANI, College of Environment, Karaj
Environmental Enginerring Department-HSE

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Published
2015-09-30
How to Cite
1.
SARKHEIL H, TAVAKOLI J, REZVANI S. An Innovative Neglected Invisible Hazard Identification (NIHI) at Workplaces; the Case of Athletics Hall Boroujen-Iran. Int J Occup Hyg. 7(3):159-166.
Section
Original Article(s)